Scrappy Hatchi Quilt by Patricia Belyea

scrappy hatchi quilt

By Patricia Belyea

When I started on my Scrappy Hatchi Quilt, Joe Cunningham gave me a winning tip. “Make the blocks small. A scrap quilt needs to be jewel-like.” That was excellent advice as I was thinking of making 8” blocks, following the Hatchi Quilt Manifesto.

To follow are instructions for making your own Scrappy Hatchi Quilt:

Unfinished block size—4.5" square
Finished block size—4" square

Each block is made with two fabrics—a pattern and a solid.

Include as many patterned cottons as possible. Fussy-cut the patterns so there’s something interesting in each block.

Choose one solid (or perhaps two similar solids, such as two grays) as a supporting color.

Block Configurations:

Hatchi Quilt Proportions by Patricia Belyea1/4 + 3/4 Configuration
Make a few blocks in this configuration. 
Unfinished block:
Pattern—1 1/2"W x 4 1/2"H
Solid—3 1/2"W x 4 1/2"H

1/2 + 1/2 Configuration
Make a small number of this configuration.
Unfinished block:
Pattern—2 1/2"W x 4 1/2"H
Solid—2 1/2"W x 4 1/2"H

3/4 + 1/4 Configuration
Make lots of this configuration. You want a bevy of patterns in the composition!
Unfinished block:
Pattern—3 1/2"W x 4 1/2"H
Solid—1 1/2"W x 4 1/2"H

Arrange the blocks on point, with the solids creating a pinwheel effect within each group of four blocks. 

Close-up of Scrappy Hatchi Quilt by Patricia BelyeaScrappy Matchi Quilt, in progress, by Patricia Belyea

Along the edges of the quilt top, add triangular solids. These are one-half of 4 1/2" squares.

If you’re working with yukata cottons, there are often large areas of hand-dyed color as background for the lyrical designs.

Scrappy Hatchi Quilt, in progress, by Patricia Belyea

Sew the blocks in the long angled rows together. Press the seams of the odd-numbered rows to the left. Press the seams of the even-numbered rows to the right.

Sew the long rows together, nesting the seams. Press the long seams down.

Once the top is complete, make a back. I made my back out of large blocks of colorful yukata cottons.

Back of Scrappy Hatchi Quilt, in progress, by Patricia Belyea

Now it’s time to complete the quilt project. There are lots of options.

For me, I pin basted my quilt sandwich. Then I stitched-in-the-ditch on all the seams of the quilt top.

After blocking and trimming, I finished my quilt with a fun facing. (Not everyone has a sumo wrestler riding a wild boar on their bed quilt!)

Pin-basting Scrappy Hatchi Quilt by Patricia BelyeaSumo wrestler facing on Scrappy Hatchi Quilt by Patricia Belyea

For 3-D interest,  I added yarn ties to the middle of the pinwheels.

Yarn for ties for Scrappy Hatchi Quilt by Patricia BelyeaFinished Scrappy Hatchi Quilt by Patricia BelyeaScrappy Hatchi Quilt by Patricia BelyeaScrappy Hatchi Quilt by Patricia Belyea

This quilt can be made in any size. The number of blocks you make determines the final dimensions. 

Consider turquoise or warm red for the supporting solid color—or any color you like. And be sure to add an unexpected fabric for the facing!

Scrappy Hatchi Quilt by Patricia Belyea


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